There is A Good Chance Kendrick Lamar’s Releasing Another Album, Here’s Why

Okay, so hear me out people: We need to bow down to the gods for this new K. Dot joint. Anyone who knows me knows that my Kendrick fandom knows no limits. Your boy been putting people on the king kunta ship since Section.80 days. So please don’t ever question my loyalties, because a nigga is about to go hard right now and say some shit that might be hard to hear. 

DAMN. is dope. In the future, when we look back on this album, it will most definitely go on the classic’s shelf. We can’t say Kendrick is slowing down even a little bit. This ain’t  a nonesense Drake project, where all you’re hearing is a dude who’s been running out of shit to say for 3 albums too many. Kendrick is still dropping gems, and we still need to hear him out.  But brace yourself for what I’m about to say: As dope as DAMN. is, it’s incomplete.  I know Kendrick is holding out on some serious fire, and I’m going to need him to stop fucking with my emotions like this. I haven’t slept in days. 

How do I know this? Because this isn’t a new Kendrick sound. It’s on a G.K.M.C vibe, which is lit af, and I’ll definitely bump it until my neck crack back, but Kendrick is a man who pushes musical boundaries. And if you heard T.P.A.B, then you know that whatever comes next has to be some serious fire that will make you question everything about reality, and that will also push a whole new sound and move Hip Hop forward.  However amazing we are all saying this album is, I don’t think it’s K. Dot’s final product.

I did some research. When Kendrick was discussing his latest album to New York Style magazine, he said, “We’re in a time where we exclude one major component out of this whole thing called life: God,” he went on and said, “Nobody speaks on it because it’s almost in conflict with what’s going on in the world when you talk about politics and government and the system.” So when you hear what he’s saying in this interview, and then listen to the album, it feels like he still has something to say, and a different sound to build upon from T.P.A.B

A lot folks are out here on the internet putting some intense theories together, and I ain’t mad at them for it. The main being that DAMN. is part 1 of a 2 part album. That makes sense. It came out on Good Friday, to which Christians observe the crucifiction of Jesus, and it would seem logical that he would maybe drop another one tomorrow, on Easter, Resurrection Sunday

Here is one person taking the theoretical game to another level: 

Also, to take this theory home, a bunch of folks on K. Dot’s team were on social media alluding to something bigger than what we’re seeing and hearing right now. 

Like here:

And this:

And…:

We’re in a period of artists pulling crazy surprises. And Kendrick is leading that front. We didn’t know when T.B.A.B was going to drop, or The Heart part 4, or Humble.  I can see him announcing an album, making us feel all cozy in our seats, and then slapping us with some next-level-shit. That would be the Kendrick we all know, and it would make this the greatest Easter ever–mainly because I’ve never had a reason to celebrate before. 

So I’m just going to sip my tea, sit by my phone, and keep hiting refresh on Kendrick’s Instagram. 

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Double Bass Ep. 3: Beverage Snobber; Get That Pepsi Outcha Mouth

Your boy decided to embark on a new journey: podcasting. Here is Episode 3 of Double Bass with Wynton St. Claire. We talk about all the things we hate about pepsi, Dave Chappelle’s problematic Netflix Special, and Kendrick Lamar’s “Humble.”

 

The Grammy’s Gentrified Hip Hop

images (5)That night when Macklemore won 4 Grammy’s and Kendrick came out empty-handed. This is why I stopped taking awards shows seriously. It stopped being about talent a long time ago, and last night it reached new lows when they straight dissed “good kid, m.A.A.d city.” Hip Hop just got gentrified.

Once in  a decade–and I mean that–an artist will come along and transform an entire art form. Today, that artist is Kendrick Lamar. He embodies all the things we look for in a hip hop artists: flow, consciousness, genius conceptions, and a gangster complex. Even before “good kid, m.A.A.d city” dropped, I was pushing the K. Dot bandwagon hard. So hard, in fact, by the time the legendary album did come out, most of my friends didn’t want to hear what I had to say, because they already knew the extent to which my man crush could carry in a conversation.

A lot of people want to compare him to the second coming of Nas, and “good kid” to the “Illmatic.” It’s not a bad comparison, and I think it fits. There is a lot weight behind that album, and so many layers that speak to me when I listen to it. The themes of being black, living in a cesspool of violence, and the unpredictable violence that follows is a heavy pill to swallow when you actually listen to it. So often we hear artists acknowledging where they come from, but how they conquered it. Kendrick doesn’t take that route. Rather, he shows that he is, in fact, a good kid in a mad city.

The fact that we would witness a rapper like K. Dot, who represents everything you could ask for in an artist, get dissed that badly proves there is always an agenda behind awards shows like the Grammy’s. And this year it was validating white hip hop–if that’s even a safe word to call it.

 

Kendrick Lamar’s Shock Therapy

k dotI’m sure we all heard about our boy Kendrick Lamar dropping one of the hottest verses of the year on Big Sean’s track, “Control.” I’m vibing with this track for so many reasons: the tasteful sample, the diverse approaches from all three emcees, as well as the buzz that was created over K. Dot’s words–in less than a wee–from the hip hop universe are all reasons to get  your blood pumping over this joint. It’s a special thing to witness a rapper name-drop so many other emcees, self-proclaim himself as the king of a city he isn’t even from, and the response isn’t hate, but rather other driven emcees simply answering his call to arms in friendly competition–but competition nonetheless.

It’s a common occurrence for people to divide themselves into two camps for hip hop: Old School and New School.  For as long as I can remember, the “old school” fans of hip hop always loved to reminisce on the “Golden Age of Hip Hop”, when rappers could do no wrong and the only thing that mattered was the integrity and quality of the music; as opposed to now, when most of the hip hop that receives publicity is mediocre at best, and revolves more around profit than actual content. These opinions are justifiable, there are a lot of mediocre emcees out there dropping a lot of trash that’s getting undeserved attention, but it’s not like this is anything new. We have a tendency to over romanticize the past and pretend like old school hip hop was this ratchet-free zone where every emcee was immune to imperfections. The reality, however, was that mediocrity existed then as much as it does now, it’s just that hip hop has become so large, reaching so many spaces around the world, that it’s impossible to not notice how much sub-par content currently exists.

That’s what makes Kendrick’s verse so amazing: he’s reminding us that hip hop ain’t dead, because many of its inhabitants are still reaching for greatness, determined to be all they can be, while at the same time bringing others along for the ride. The music may keep changing forms, but it is as alive now as it was before, it’s just we sometimes forget what to keep our ears open to. The one word that comes to  mind when I think of the music that has been released these last few years is “ambition.” So much innovation, creativity, and originality is coming  from this new generation of artists, and Kendrick Lamar reminded us that this is the new norm. You listen to “good kid, m.A.A.d city,” and you can sense the dedication that was put into such a masterful work. The same goes for so many other artists attempting to test their limits, as well as what our own ears are willing to handle.

So for me, K. Dot’s verse isn’t anything revolutionary, because it’s what I’ve grown to expect from him and so many other emcees who have been attempting to push the bar to another level: a determination for excellence, and nothing less than.