Trayvon, And Justice, In Ruins

With the verdict of Zimmerman already made, so are questions and answers. Particularly, the value of a black man in a legal system that hails its origins from a history of devaluing people who are black. We already knew Zimmerman killed Trayvon Martin, all evidence pointed to that clear fact, but whether or not he killed him was not the point. The point  was to … Continue reading Trayvon, And Justice, In Ruins

I, Too, Have Been Trayvon Martin…

 I’ve been following the George Zimmerman trial pretty heavily and it’s horrifying for all the obvious reasons. Regardless of what the verdict is in this case will turn out to be, though, it has me thinking just one thing: I, too, along with so many other black men, have been Trayvon Martin at one point or another. Being black, I have a small understanding at … Continue reading I, Too, Have Been Trayvon Martin…

Racism and “Post-Racial America” part 3: A Short History On Voting Rights Up Until June 25, 2013

 “I was disappointed, because I think what the court did today is stamp the Voting Rights Act of 1965 in its very heart. It is a major set back. We may not have people being beaten today, maybe they are not being denied the right to participate or to register to vote, they are not being chased by police dogs or trampled by horses, but … Continue reading Racism and “Post-Racial America” part 3: A Short History On Voting Rights Up Until June 25, 2013

Racism and “Post-Racial America” part 2: The Racist Legacy That Inspired Affirmative Action

Just yesterday the Supreme Court sent the case Fisher v. University of Texas, No. 11-345 back to the lower courts to be decided once again. In a way, this can be seen as a half-victory for everyone in favor of affirmative action, because it means we haven’t lost. But on the flip side, it can also be seen as an inevitable failure, because the court seemed … Continue reading Racism and “Post-Racial America” part 2: The Racist Legacy That Inspired Affirmative Action

Racism and “Post-Racial America” part 1: When Keeping it Real Goes Wrong With Paula Deen

A lot of buzz is going around  about Paula Deen’s racial remarks  when she suggested a slavery themed wedding for her brother, in which everyone who is serving food be black to give the ambiance of an Antebellum plantation. Now, her show has been dropped, and she’s floating in the racist pool alone without a lifeguard in sight.  This ain’t her week. And this is just weeks … Continue reading Racism and “Post-Racial America” part 1: When Keeping it Real Goes Wrong With Paula Deen

Obama’s Disillusioned Morehouse Speech

The other day, Barack and Michelle Obama both spoke at two different HBCU’s Commencement Ceremonies–Morehouse and Bowie State. Their presence, in theory, is extraordinary and significant for all of the obvious reasons: Whether or not they went to an HBCU, their success is the result of the efforts and purpose HBCUs have served over the last 150 years. At the same time, what they said holds another significance, a different significance. Words … Continue reading Obama’s Disillusioned Morehouse Speech

Django: Why the Truth Matters

Well, I finally got around to watching  “Django Unchained” the other day. I’m probably the  last person to have seen the film, and I did so reluctantly (and illegally, at that). After several months of reading articles that had nothing good to say about the movie, I figured it was time I do my own research and go to the primary source by watching the movie myself–and then [shamelessly] … Continue reading Django: Why the Truth Matters