The Emancipation of the Black Athlete

When Colin Kaepernick first took a knee during the National Anthem, he did so to raise the conversation of black genocide at the hands of the state. If there is any indicator as to how urgent it was for him to do so, it was in the response from the viewers, the fans, the owners, and even our President. It has been a message that … Continue reading The Emancipation of the Black Athlete

From 60 Years Ago Until Donald Trump Today: A History of Making Racism Sound Socially Appealing

Last week,  we saw the unimaginable happen–the UK voted to leave the EU in the name of xenophobia and fear of all things non-white. If it can happen there, it can happen anywhere. For me, being black and living in the US,  this is frightening. Because what divided the UK vote and put Europe in shambles was the same conversation that are dividing voters in … Continue reading From 60 Years Ago Until Donald Trump Today: A History of Making Racism Sound Socially Appealing

Barack Obama Responds to the Four African American 6th Graders’ Letter on #BlackLivesMatter

It’s been almost 3 months since I first shared the letter from the four African American 6th graders–Zayd, Phoenix, Keidy, and Bryson–addressed to President Barack Obama. In the letter, they point to the depressing statistics facing African American youth today, and inform Obama that as an African American in the highest elected office, he has a duty to helping find solutions to institutional racism. The … Continue reading Barack Obama Responds to the Four African American 6th Graders’ Letter on #BlackLivesMatter

The Nuances Behind Charlie Hebdo, and How We Act

On Wednesday, we witnessed 12 people people pay the ultimate price for free speech. I of all people know how valuable free speech is, this blog is a testament to that sacredness. But we need to be honest about how we honor these lives, and to what extent we criticize what Charlie Hebdo stood up to. There is a fine line between defending free speech, … Continue reading The Nuances Behind Charlie Hebdo, and How We Act

Reflections on Ferguson: Notes From Malawi

As I write this, I sit in a cafe in the city of Blantrye, the second largest city in Malawi. It’s a beautiful country–from the people, the scenery,  and the mood that fills my soul. But what’s most beautiful is how I fit into this space. This is the land of the resting place of my grandparents, of their parents and grandparents as well. I have … Continue reading Reflections on Ferguson: Notes From Malawi

A Tale of Two Drug Wars (Part 2)

Last week, I wrote about how the legalization of weed in Colorado doesn’t automatically connect to the War on Drugs–or to the incredible racial bias in a blatantly racist criminal justice system–unless we allow it to. Today, in 2014, the U.S. incarcerates more people than any other country. When the majority of these people are of color, and who–as studies show–are serving time for an … Continue reading A Tale of Two Drug Wars (Part 2)