A White 6th Grader’s Letter on #BlackLivesMatter and Being an Ally

Recently, four 6th graders at the school I work at wrote a letter to President Barack Obama on the #BlackLivesMatter movement. It’s a powerful letter, and you can read it here. So powerful is the letter, in fact, it received thousands of shares, tv stations ran the story, and just a few weeks ago, President Barack Obama even wrote back.

What’s more inspiring is while all of this was going on, one of the boys’ classmates, a white student named Louis, wrote his own letter to the President–largely inspired by what his four classmates had already written.  

Louis’s letter isn’t attempting to overshadow what the boys have done. It’s a letter of encouragement, and more importantly, it is an example of what white allyship can adequately look like. This may be an issue that impacts Black youth at disproportionate rates to whites, but white youth should still be contributing to this movement. Silence is its own form of oppression, and this movement–this world–could use more people like Louis, where at just 12 years old, he is understanding his privilege and that he also  has a social responsibility: to be an ally.

 

Here is the letter:

Dear Mr. President,

Inequality is a huge problem in our modern day world, even at a young, elementary school age. Studies have shown that black students were three times more likely to be expelled than white students in the 2011-2012 school year. It is hard to imagine that a black child who is doing the same thing as a white child is being treated worse. I feel as though I should give back to people of color in every way possible to make up for the harsh injustices that have happened to people of color in the past. I try to remind myself that I am not one of the many people who believe that the color of someone’s skin makes them better or worse than another person.

In the news I hear about all the horrible things that have gone on involving inequality. I hear about the killing of Michael Brown, I hear about the statistics that are so far from fair, but I also hear about my schoolmates. I am so proud of my four schoolmates for standing up and bringing inequality under a spotlight. They wrote a letter that has gone so far, to thousands of internet shares and a place in the news. I feel strong when I know that they made a difference.

But they also received hate from people who wrote rude things, because these people knew that if they wrote it on a viral article they would get attention. And that disgusts me. I posted a video for a school project on YouTube about the importance of Black Lives Matter. Somehow, someone found the video and posted hateful comments toward me and people of color. He assumed I was African American and said “…As long as too many blacks commit too many crimes, like over half the murders, you are just another scumbag justifying your races criminal behavior your dindu attitude.”  

This ruined my day. It ruined my day because he said those incredibly racist things, but also because he assumed I was an African American.This ruined my day because he thought there was no such thing as an ally, someone who stands up for people who are being bullied when they are not. Every Time I read a disturbing fact about white people treating black people with inequality I feel emotional. I feel emotional about the injustice of it, but I also feel emotional about the fact that I am white. I wish that I did not have something in common with this person who is being so rude to their victim but also to themselves. This person who commented assumed I was black because I cared, but just because I am white and these issues do not affect me does not mean that I do not care.

When you bully someone of a different skin color, you are bullying one of your fellow  human beings. And I say bully because anybody who treats someone differently because of their skin color is a bully. And everyone has been bullied, just on lower or higher levels. They are no different from yourselves. If everyone hated different looking or thinking people it would be a messed up world.

The whole reason I am writing this letter to you is because after reading my schoolmates letter, I learned about the Black Lives Matter movement in America. After reading so many letters, facts, and articles I have learned that black lives do matter and inequality is a massive issue in America that needs to be addressed. Everyone has the right to be treated equal, and that’s not happening.

I encourage you to read their letter as well. We all would like to conference with you about this problem that needs to be addressed. Inequality is an emergency that need to be tended to.

~Louis, on behalf of Keidy, Zayd, Bryson, and Phoenix.

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